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Keeping It Real Estate News and Trends in UK Real Estate, Disputes and Planning Law

Monthly Archives: February 2019

Posted in Real Estate News

Question: Is an invasion of privacy a legal nuisance?

Answer: Those who live in glass houses should not throw stones (or complain about prying neighbours) The recent case of Fearn & Others v The Board of Trustees of the Tate Gallery [2019], concerned a dispute between the Tate Modern and its residential neighbours over the Tate’s public viewing platform. The case makes clear that

Posted in Real Estate News

Time’s up for residential letting fees

The Tenant Fees Act 2019 received royal assent on 12 February and comes into force on 1 June 2019. The Act aims to improve transparency and affordability in England’s residential lettings market. It bans various fees often charged to tenants – including fees for reference checks, key collection and inventories. It also caps permitted payments.

Posted in Real Estate News

Consumer disputes in the housing sector: a long-awaited reform

Consumer access to remedy has long been a neglected part of what many consider to be an already broken housing market. Housing disputes are heard in a number of different legal settings and the process is often convoluted and opaque. As a result, this vulnerable part of the real estate sector (private renters, social housing

Posted in Real Estate News

Non-resident SDLT surcharge: adding 1% and more complexity

When the government announced in 2018 that foreign investors into the UK property market were to be targeted with an additional SDLT levy, we said that the devil would be in the detail. The consultation document published this week gives that detail. But just how devilish is it? The government is going ahead with a

Posted in Planning

A beginners’ guide to affordable housing in London

It is estimated that the population of London will reach 10.8 million by 2041. According to the Mayor of London, around 43,500 affordable homes are required each year in order to meet London’s housing needs. Yet the issue as to how these homes will be delivered is one that remains controversial. The provision of “genuinely